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HELP PAKISTAN AND KASHMIR AFTER DEVASTATING, MASSIVE FLOODS

nancyk58

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News in relation to natural disasters on 27.12.10

News in relation to natural disasters on 27.12.10

27.12.10: UN ORGANIZATION WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP) STOPS DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD IN BAJAUR in north-western Pakistan where a female suicide bomber killed 40 (including herself) on 25.12.10.

More than 300,000 people who are dependent on food aid are affected by this decision.

WFP: Food distribution will not be resumed until the security situation has been reviewed.
 

nancyk58

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News on 18.1.11 in relation to PAKISTAN

News on 18 January 2011 in relation to PAKISTAN


Danish DR1 + TV2 News + Swedish SVT and German ZDFtext:

POWERFUL MAGNITUDE 7.2 EARTHQUAKE HIT SOUTH-WESTERN PAKISTAN

South-western Pakistan has been struck by a powerful magnitude 7.2 earthquake (initially stated to be a magnitude 7.4 earthquake) according to US Geological Survey.

The epicentre of the quake was at 10km depth. The quake struck at 1:23 local time about 50km west of the town DALBANDIN close to the Afghanistan border. The area is sparsely populated and known for its seismic activity.

No reports of casualties or material damage. And no tsunami was triggered.

According to media reports, the earthquake could be felt in several provinces and also in INDIA's capital, New Delhi.

In 2005, more than 73,000 died when a magnitude 7.6 earthquake hit the north-western Pakistan and Kashmir.
 

nancyk58

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NEWS ON 21 JANUARY 2010 IN RELATION TO PAKISTAN

NEWS ON 21 JANUARY 2010 IN RELATION TO PAKISTAN

Swedish SVT: MORE THAN 4 MILLION HOMELESS PAKISTANI 6 MONTHS AFTER THE GREAT FLOOD ACCORDING TO RED CROSS

Families are leaving the temporary camps and returning home only to find out that there is NOTHING to return to. This leads to a new wave of displacement according to Red Cross.

The floods in July and August hit 21 million people and destroyed millions of homes and vast areas of agricultural land.
 

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Six Month Anniversary of Pakistan Floods Sees “A Crisis of Epic Proportions”

Six Month Anniversary of Pakistan Floods Sees “A Crisis of Epic Proportions”

posted by: Suzi Parras (from care2causes)

Six months after the worst monsoon floods in 80 years wreaked havoc on Pakistan, killing more than 1,700 people and affecting up to 20 million others, “we are seeing a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions,” according to Kristen Elsby, UNICEF’s chief of communications in Pakistan.

The flooding started on July 28, 2010 in the mountainous north and quickly raged south over the next month, following the path of the Indus River. It submerged one-fifth of the country, left more than 7 million people homeless, and damaged 5.4 million acres of arable land. Some of that farmland is still under water, raising concerns about next summer’s harvest.

Oxfam, too, believes the crisis is far from over, and could get worse. As Neva Khan, head of Oxfam’s Pakistan office said during a press conference in Islamabad, “the aid community has done a tremendous amount, but given the immense scale of this disaster, we have only scratched the surface of human need.”

Today, in the flood-ravaged areas of the south, malnutrition rates rival those of sub-Saharan Africa. “I haven’t seen malnutrition this bad since the worst of the famine in Ethiopia, Darfur and Chad,” Karen Allen, deputy head of UNICEF in Pakistan said in a statement.

The United Nations says hundreds of thousands of Pakistani children -- particularly in the southeastern SINDH province, the area hardest hit -- are suffering from acute malnutrition, almost a quarter of the children in the region.

Shelter is a grave concern, 1.7 million homes were destroyed by the floodwaters, 900,000 of them in Sindh alone.


There’s been small progress. According to United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, about 166,00 people currently live in 240 camps and roadside settlements, down from 3.3 million in October.

The U.N. appealed for approximately $2 billion in aid last September but has only received 56% of it to date. According to the BBC, Pakistan's government is scheduled to halt most emergency relief efforts this month, but Oxfam is calling on the government to extend its deadline.

As the Guardian points out: “Before the floods the western aid effort in Pakistan focused on the north-west, where an earthquake struck in 2005 and military operations against the Taliban have displaced millions.

After the floods, aid workers admit to being caught offguard by the problem in Sindh. "It was a real wake-up call," said one.”

The U.N. claims almost 10 million people have received essential medical assistance, and about 7 million are receiving monthly food rations. In addition, an estimated 3.5 million people have access to safe drinking water.

But longer-term recovery will require continuing these services as well as reopening schools and reviving agriculture.
“We are helping farmers in recovering their land by providing them with seeds, fertilizers and tools to accelerate the rehabilitation process. At the same time the humanitarian community will continue to provide food aid as long as it is needed,” Rauf Engin Soysal, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Assistance to Pakistan said in a statement. Humanitarian aid agencies are working in concert to alleviate the crisis.

The World Food Programme has been providing support to more than 5 million Pakistanis, according to WFP official Carl Paulsson. He says his organization has enough funding to continue through February, but would then experience shortages unless it received more support.

Save the Children has reached more than 2.6 million flood-affected people through emergency medical care, distribution of shelter materials, food, child protection, education, and livelihoods support.

“It’s going to be a long haul. Twenty million people is more than the population of about 180 countries in the world, more people affected than Haiti, the [2004 Asian] tsunami, and the [2005] Kashmir earthquake combined,” says Allison Zelkowitz, Deputy Team Leader for Programming for Save the Children’s Emergency Response Program in Pakistan. “It’s really a vast number of people in a very economically challenged country, so it’s going to take a couple of years to really recover to where they were before.”

Top 5 Shocking Facts About The Pakistan Floods

posted by: Beth Buczynski 153 days ago (i.e. from the beginning of September 2010)

Devastating floods have been ravaging Pakistan for over a month, but despite widespread suffering, the media coverage of this disaster has been casual at best.

Nearly 20 million Pakistanis have been displaced from their homes and put at risk for water born disease, yet the American media seems to have marginalized the issue, impeding the flow of supplies and donations needed to provide aid.

Some believe that "the West and Europe have adopted Islamaphobia, which obviously has clouded humanitarian concerns" (Huffington Post).

You don't have to be a political analyst to see that more social and political unrest isn't what this region needs. People are suffering, and as fellow humans and activists, it is our duty to do what we can.

Here are 5 things you may not have known about the Pakistan floods. Become informed, and then take action!

1. The United Nations has rated the floods in Pakistan as the greatest humanitarian crisis in recent history. Already, more people have been affected in Pakistan than the 2004 South-East Asian tsunami and the recent earthquakes in Kasmir and Haiti combined.

2. The Pakistan flood may be linked to the fires in Russia. Although the unfolding disasters seem far apart, they are actually being driven by the same meta weather system, according to a report from National Geographic. Kevin Trenberth, a senior scientist at the Boulder, Colorado-based National Center for Atmospheric Research, told the organization, "That's because the monsoon – a seasonal wind system that brings rain and floods to Pakistan and much of the rest of Asia in summer – also drives the circulation of air as far away as Europe."

3. Only a fraction of the people needing aid have been contacted by emergency crews. In the 10 days following the initial flood waves, the government managed to distribute only 10,000 food packs, which contained a box of dried milk, and a few bottles of water and Pepsi. These packages were meant to "feed" 80,000 people, leaving 1,720,000 without any type of aid.

4. The Pakistan flood may be linked to global warming. In an unprecedented move, the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) has come forward to formally blamed the flooding in Pakistan on "global warming," angering some denialists (CNSNews.com). "Indeed, the Islamic world is paying a heavy price resulting from the negative repercussions of climate change," said OIC Secretary-General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu at an emergency meeting in Saudi Arabia.

5. The destruction is enormous, and preys on the weak. Reports indicate 62,000 square miles of land have been affected -- about one-fifth of the entire country. Of the 15 million people seriously affected, about 50 percent are children.
 

nancyk58

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Article from care2causes - how a ten-year-old girl experienced the floods

http://www.care2.com/causes/human-rights/blog/the-pakistan-floods-through-the-eyes-of-a-ten-year-old-girl/

The Pakistan Floods Through the Eyes of a Ten Year Old Girl

posted by: Suzi Parrasch

NAILA is ten years old. She lives in a village called Mirpur Buriro in the Sindh province of Pakistan – one of the areas hardest hit by last summer’s devastating floods. Naila escaped the flooding with her parents, three brothers and five sisters, but her home and her village were destroyed. The family fled to Hyderabad, staying briefly with her sister’s family before settling in a camp. Today Naila and her family are back in Mirpur Buriro, trying to piece together their lives.
According to the Pakistani government, 20 million people have been affected by the floods, including 9 million children.

“Many children still struggle in the aftermath of the flood,” says David Wright, Save the Children’s Pakistan country director. “Many have nightmares and they have not come to terms with the disaster. They do not have proper clothes they have lost their toys, and their schools remain closed.”

Save the Children recently led a psychological assessment of 120 children ages 5 to 15 in order to gauge the impact the disaster is having on the youngest victims. Perhaps not surprisingly, fear of water, people and darkness, insecurity, and aggression all top the list.

Now, as families are so desperately trying to restore their lives, support mechanisms are ever more critical to helping them move forward.

SAVE THE CHILDREN and other organizations have set up hundreds of “Child Friendly Spaces” across the flood-damaged areas -- centers specifically designed to provide a sense of normalcy and security. The centers offer crucial life and skills-building activities, a safe haven for children traumatized by what they are living through. Activities include art therapy, reading, group counseling, and playtime.

Workers at Save the Children met Naila at a Child Friendly Space in her village and she told them her story. Imagine what life must be like for this ten year old – and thousands, if not millions just like her -- as you read what she has to say:


"I had faced the worst days of my life after the floods started. When I heard about the floods, the first thing came in to my mind was that, oh God! We are all going to die tomorrow.

We shifted to the city of Hyderabad, to my sister’s house, as she is married there and lives there with her husband. But she has small home and our family is very large so we could not live there for long. We shifted to a relief camp near to her house. Those were the worst days I have ever spent in my life.

We lost most of the things in the flood water, as we could not take our belongings with us to Hyderabad and when we came back, everything was either washed away or ruined by the water and mud. In our village, the water was higher than me.

I have experienced the life in the camp and know how people live in the camps. When I was living in the camp in Hyderabad, the behavior of people was very bad; they used to tease the poor people and women, I did not like the environment of that camp, it really annoyed me. I used to get scared and cried a lot.

When Naila returned to Mirpur Buriro she started going to the local Child Friendly Space as well as a Temporary Learning Center with her brothers and sisters.
I like coming here, I enjoy being here, sometimes I want to study and play for the whole day. I really enjoy the games we play and the books we read.

Now I feel good that I can go to school and resume back my studies. I have a place to play and I feel very happy, I have almost forgotten the bad memories of flood I used to carry in my head.

The thing I like the most in this Child Friendly Space is that we can continue our education and we can play together. And I like the teacher there, she loves me a lot."


Naila is lucky she was able to escape the floods with her family intact. Many children were not so lucky, separated from their parents when the disaster struck and yet to be reunited. These young flood victims are at risk of exploitation and abuse, and the longer schools remain closed, the more critical the situation becomes.

Child Friendly Spaces play an especially vital role in ensuring, as much as they possibly can, that these children have a secure place to turn to, with the hope, as Wright says, of transforming the disaster into “a catalyst for change by helping children become safer, healthier, happier, and more educated than they were before.”
 

zeeval

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How can you ensure that the donations will go in the right hands.
 

nancyk58

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I would say that if you donate via the well-known organizations such as Oxfam, Red Cross and Unicef + Médécins sans Frontières then you should be safe that your money will end up in the right place.
 

bogert

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Still millions of people are victims of flood.Donate them as more as you can.
 

ilovechriss

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I would say that if you donate via the well-known organizations such as Oxfam, Red Cross and Unicef + Médécins sans Frontières then you should be safe that your money will end up in the right place.
Thank you Nancy! :nice:
 

nancyk58

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Thank you Nancy! :nice:
You're welcome.


@ bogert: Thanks for your post, bogert. I know that the flooding has affected many millions, but Pakistan is somehow not in the news anymore so many people might think that everything is alright there now. So much better that you inform us of the fact that this is indeed not the case.

Consequently, I'll repeat your appeal, Bogert:


Still millions of people are victims of flood. Donate as much as you can for these victims.

Oxfam, Red Cross and Unicef + Médécins sans Frontières are reliable organizations so I am sure that you are safe that your money will end up in the right place if you donate via these organizations. Go to post 1 of this thread where you can find info on how to donate via these organizations.
 

nancyk58

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16312355

23 December 2011 Last updated at 04:43 GMT

World Bank gives $5.5bn aid to Pakistan to boost growth

The World Bank has said it will give $5.5bn (£3.5bn) in development aid to Pakistan to support poverty reduction and economic growth.

The funding will provide support to critical social services such as education and health.

It will also support infrastructure programmes aimed at creating jobs and restoring long-term growth.

Floods earlier this year left some 200,000 people homeless and slowed Pakistan's economy.

"We will continue our strong support to Pakistan, while keeping a keen eye on implementation to ensure that these efforts translate into real results on the ground," Rachid Benmessaoud, the World Bank's Pakistan director was quoted as saying by the AFP news agency.

Slowing growth

Flooding in Pakistan affected almost one-fifth of the country's agricultural area, causing extensive damage to crops and food production.

At the same time, industrial production in the country was also hurt due to supply chain disruption and power outages.

The State Bank of Pakistan has warned the economy is likely to post slower-than-expected growth of between 3%-4% in the current financial year.

Its views were echoed by the World Bank, which said that the country's recovery from the floods remains slow.

The World Bank's $5.5bn funding will be comprised of $4bn in development assistance and $1.5bn from the bank's International Finance Corporation (IFC), which helps private sector firms.

"We are committed to helping Pakistan realize its potential especially in key sectors such as infrastructure, renewable energy and agribusiness," said IFC Middle East director Mouayed Mahlouf.

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