Welcome to Coldplaying!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

SignUp Now!

Aid for Haiti

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
NEWS ON 29.1.11 IN RELATION TO HAITI

NEWS ON 29.1.11 IN RELATION TO HAITI


Swedish SVT: HAITI'S ELECTION RESULT WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT WEEK

The final result of the disputed first round of the presidential election in Haiti in November will be published on Wednesday 2 February 2011 according to the election commission.

The second round of the election will be held on 20.3.

The publication of the preliminary results from the first round caused enormous protests when president Réné Préval's hand-picked candidate Jude Celestin was announced as number 2 in the first round with more votes than a popular singer. Now the government party has withdrawn its support to Celestin.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
News on 1.2.11 in relation to HAITI

Swedish SVT: Aristide is allowed to return to HAITI

Haiti's government is prepared to issue a diplomat passport to former president Jean-Bertrand Aristide. That means that he can return after 11 years in exile in South Africa, a high official announced on Monday 31.1.11.

Aristide, Haiti's first democratically elected president has expressed his will to return to help his country. He was forced to leave Haiti in 2004 after an armed uprising.

Recently the former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier returned to Haiti.


Swedish SVT: 6 million dollars on ex-dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier's bank account has been blocked by the Swiss authorities.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
News in relation to HAITI on 2.2.11

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12342870

2 February 2011 Last updated at 11:09 GMT

HAITI ELECTION: Second round line-up to be announced

Haitian authorities are due to announce definitive first round results from November's disputed presidential poll.

Former first lady Mirlande Manigat is in the delayed second round, now set for 20 March.

But it is not clear whether she will face singer Michel Martelly or government candidate Jude Celestin.


Initial results put Mr Celestin through, sparking days of unrest. International monitors said there had been widespread fraud in his favour.

Under sustained international pressure, the ruling party, Inite, withdrew Mr Celestin from the race but the candidate himself has refused to confirm that he will not take part.

The second round was supposed to take place last month but was postponed because of the dispute.

There have been calls, including from some of the other defeated candidates, that the election should be scrapped and a new one held.

Uncertainty

Mrs Manigat won the first round on 28 November, while preliminary results gave Mr Celestin a narrow lead over Mr Martelly.

But within hours of the announcement, there were protests and riots by supporters of Mr Martelly, who complained of vote-rigging.

The incumbent President, Rene Preval, called in a team of international monitors who found widespread fraud in Mr Celestin's favour and recommended that he withdraw.

Mr Preval's mandate formally ends on 7 February but he has parliamentary approval to stay in office until 14 May.


The political uncertainty has added to Haiti's problems as it tries to recover from last year's devastating earthquake as well as a cholera outbreak.

The situation has also been complicated by last month's surprise return from exile of former leader Jean-Claude Duvalier.

Baby Doc, as he is widely known, now faces corruption and human rights abuse charges relating to his 1971-1986 rule. He has denied any wrongdoing.

In another development, the government has now said it is ready to issue former President Jean-Betrand Aristide a passport, opening the way for his possible return.

Mr Aristide, the first democratically-elected president of Haiti, was ousted seven years ago and has been living in exile in South Africa.

His party, Fanmi Lavalas, was barred from standing in the latest presidential and legislative elections, allegedly due to technical errors in its application forms.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
News on 3.2.11 in relation to HAITI

NEWS on 3.2.11 in relation to natural disasters


Danish DR1: HAITI's ELECTION COMMITTEE PUBLISHES THE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES FIGURING ON THE BALLOT IN THE SECOND ELECTION ROUND ON 20 MARCH 2011: Former first lady MIRLANDE MANIGAT and the popular singer MICHEL MARTELLY

The first election round on 22.11.10 was chaotic. Since then it was difficult to decide who was to run against Mirlande Manigat who was the winner of the first round, but who had less than the necessary 50% of the votes to avoid a second round. The regime tried to have its own candidate - Jude Célestin - on the ballot in the second round, but lost.

This outcome is in accordance with the recommendations from the organization OAS (Organization of American States) and is backed up by the United Nations and the USA.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
U.S. RESUMES DEPORTATIONS OF HAITIANS - 7.2.11

U.S. RESUMES DEPORTATIONS OF HAITIANSposted by: Natasha G.

The U.S. has resumed deporting Haitians after a one year post-earthquake moratorium. About 700 have been classified as "criminal aliens." Spokesperson for ICE Barbara Gonzalez contends that all are consistent with the U.S. policy of removing those who pose "a threat to public safety." Twenty seven Haitians have already been deported.

However some believe the deportations are inhumane since Haiti is still struggling with a vicious cholera epidemic that has killed almost 4,000 and infected 20,000. Haiti is also dealing with a shaky recovery from last year's deadly 7.0 earthquake and a disputed presidential election. Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center's Executive Director Cheryl Little asked, "Why is it so urgent for the U.S. to deport Haitians when Haiti remains in ruin? It makes no sense for either country." She added, "This is death by deportation."

Sure enough, 34 year-old Wildrick Guerrier died shortly after being detained in a Haitian jail, exhibiting cholera symptoms such as extreme vomiting and uncontrollable diarrhea. Guerrier had been living in the U.S. as a legal permanent resident since he was a teenager, and was completing an 18 month criminal sentence when a judge ordered for his deportation.

A number of advocacy groups came together to file an emergency petition with the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights (IACHR) to halt the deportations of hundreds of Haitian nationals by U.S. immigration authorities.

Submitted by the University of Miami School of Law, Human Rights and Immigration Clinics; the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center; the Center for Constitutional Rights, Alternative Chance, and the Loyola Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice, the petition contends, "The Haitian state has no capacity to provide for the safe and dignified reintegration of those deported, many of whom are long-time U.S. residents with no resources in Haiti...While we support the enforcement of immigration laws, we are concerned that the continuing state of emergency in Haiti will jeopardize the lives of those deported and divert resources from the recovery and reconstruction effort."

The petition also calls out the recent raids that have taken place, claiming that immigrants in Florida have been separated from their families and legal service providers, and have been sent off the remote detention camps in Louisiana. Among those detained include Haitians who were convicted of minor offenses and then released for good behavior, as well as mentally disabled individuals and parents of U.S. citizens.

To read the full petition and sign, click here.

http://capwiz.com/jesuit/issues/alert/?alertid=23241516
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
News on 14.2.11 in relation to HAITI

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12458930

14 February 2011 Last updated at 18:12

HAITI CHOLERA CHALLENGE 'FAILED' BY AGENCIES
By Mark Doyle

BBC International Development Correspondent

The cholera outbreak that has killed 3,600 people in Haiti since October 2010 has not been suppressed - despite billions of dollars in promised aid, according to a report by Haitian and US researchers.

The report says more than a third of people made homeless by the massive earthquake in January 2010, and now living in tents, still do not have access to clean water, and a quarter still do not have a toilet.

This is despite highly-publicised promises of help by aid agencies and foreign governments.

Cholera is spread through contact with human faeces - so lack of washing and toilet facilities is a direct cause of death.

The study says the epidemic has not yet peaked, so unless the situation is addressed there will be more unnecessary deaths.


The report, by New York's City University, is based on a survey by Haitian sociologists. It says aid agencies have failed to address the real causes of the cholera outbreak - including widespread poverty and unemployment that was endemic before last January's earthquake.

"Much more progress needs to be made", says the enquiry; "not only in aid delivery but in coordination".

'Missed opportunity'

The Haitian government says the earthquake killed over 230,000 people. It made around two million people homeless.

The new study says the international community and the Haitian government failed to capitalise on the movement of people out of the capital Port au Prince in the immediate aftermath of the quake.

It says there was an opportunity at that time to undo the mistakes of the past including "failed neo liberal development policies that swelled the population of shanty towns of the capital".

This was a reference to cutting import taxes on rice in the 1980s. This policy led to a flooding of the local market by US rice, a decline in local rice production, and mass rural-urban migration.

Another "neo liberal policy" was the encouraging of low-wage factory jobs in the capital. This also served as a magnet to rural people.

Aid agencies and the Haitian government should have worked outside Port au Prince, the report says, and "seized the moment to initiate job creation to rebuild rural Haiti's delapidated infrastructure".

Dire situation

"Instead, all the food-for-work and cash-for-work, not to mention aid distribution, was centred in Port au Prince. Predictably… the camps swelled to an estimated 1.7 million people at their peak, making the aid response more difficult".

The report says the situation is dire despite the widely publicised promises of aid.

In one camp for displaced people in the Carrefour district of Port au Prince, people without access to a toilet throw their faeces, wrapped in plastic bags, on top of a rubbish pile which is next to a recently-created cholera treatment centre.

As well as criticising the response to the cholera outbreak, the report questions the wider "aid dependency" which the private aid agencies - known as Non Governmental Organisations, or NGOs, have created.

It says some NGOs:

undermine the capacity of the state
have no accountability to people they serve
do not always work in under-served areas when asked to by government
lack coordination
are top-down and top-heavy.

The report says only a tiny proportion of the aid money promised to Haiti has reached the Haitian government - in the early days after the earthquake it was estimated to be just one per cent.

And yet, ultimately, the study says, it is only the government that could coordinate actions to address crises such as the cholera outbreak.

Some NGOs privately criticise the government of Haiti for CORRUPTION; foreign governments say they cannot risk handing over money to DYSFUNCTIONAL institutions.

But the report says "pointing fingers at the Haitian government or the Haitian people is not the solution".

It says some NGOs are more interested in attracting funds - and so perpetuating their own futures - than in solving the problems they say they came to Haiti to address.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
Article on HAITI on 15.2.11 from Care2 Causes

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=54472

HAITI

RESETTLEMENT PLAN EXCLUDES ALMOST 200,000 FAMILIES
By Jane Regan


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Feb 14, 2011 (IPS) - One year and one month after Haiti's horrendous earthquake, the world's eyes are focused elsewhere.

Aside from a few updates on ex-dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, Haiti has fallen from the headlines.

Gone are the foreign reporters and news crews pumping out anniversary stories.

Long-forgotten are the one-year reports from United Nations agencies, the non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and watchdog groups, full of self-congratulations or hand- wringing over the lack of progress on Haiti's reconstruction.

But there has been a kind of progress.

Haitian authorities – or, to be more precise, those who have authority in Haiti, but who are not necessarily Haitian – actually do have a plan for Haiti's homeless.

The ambitious 30-page "Neighborhood Return and Housing Reconstruction Framework (version 3)," obtained last month by Haiti Grassroots Watch, outlines plans to rebuild neighbourhoods with better zoning and better services, help homeowners rebuild safer homes, or relocate homeowners to new homes in less precarious locations.

However, the Framework leaves out Haiti's largest group of earthquake victims: the poorest of the poor. The renters.

"With a few exceptions, the reconstruction is not going to make people homeowners who were not homeowners before," Priscilla Phelps, senior advisor for Housing and Neighbourhoods for the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC), told IPS and Haiti Grassroots Watch in January.

That means 192,154 families – more than half of the 1.3 million internally displaced persons tallied last fall – will be left out in the cold. Or, in the case of Haiti, out in the sun, the rain and the dust.

According to the Framework, "[r]eturn and reconstruction will not change the tenancy status of earthquake affected households: the goal is to restore owners and renters to an equivalent status as before the earthquake, but in safer conditions."

For home- and land-owners, things are moving forward, albeit very slowly.

Humanitarian agencies have over 100 million dollars to build 111,240 "transitional shelters" or "T-Shelters" – small huts, usually 18 square metres. As of Feb. 1, only about 43,100 had been built, due to the rubble choking poor neighbourhoods and Haiti's convoluted land ownership situation. (Most donors want to be sure on land titles before building a T-Shelter.)

Agencies and construction firms also have at least 174 million dollars pledged of the 350 million dollars needed - in 2011 alone - for repairing or rebuilding homes and neighbourhoods. As of Feb. 1, of the approximately 193,000 homes needing to be repaired or rebuilt, only 2,547 had been repaired and 1,880 rebuilt.

But for the hundreds of thousands of former renters living hunched under tents in camps with few or no services, with an average of 392 residents per latrine, there is no shelter – transitional or permanent – on the horizon. Because they are supposed to rent.

Sanon Renel, of the Housing Reflection and Action Force coalition (Fòs Refleksyon ak Aksyon sou Koze Kay - FRAKKA), which is mobilising with unions and other groups on the housing issue, is outraged.

"This is pure and simple exclusion. You could even call this an official policy of apartheid," Renel told IPS.

In addition to losing all their belongings, many of Haiti's displaced also lost jobs, as well as the huge sums they had paid out for school tuitions and rent prior to the earthquake. In Haiti, one rents six, 12 and even 24 months at a time. Renel noted that it will take years for families to save that up again.

"These people are factory workers, day labourers. Many are former peasants forced into the city because their land has given out, or because they can't make ends meet. They are the eternal victims of an economic system that protects big landowners and rich capitalists," said Renel.

A typical example of "reconstruction"

The way the housing issue is being handled offers a typical example of Haiti's "reconstruction".

The Framework "is intended to signal what the approach is going to be," according to the IHRC's Phelps, who likely helped author the plan and who recently co-wrote 'Safer Homes, Stronger Communities: A Handbook for Reconstructing After Natural Disasters' for the World Bank.

But the document has never been approved by the government of Haiti. Not by the parliament, not by President René Préval, and not the Inter-Ministry Commission on Housing, which groups together five ministers.


Nor has the document ever been held up to public scrutiny or discussed at fora where local urban planners, construction firms or other stakeholders – like FRAKKA and the homeless people themselves – could perhaps make their opinions known.

Nevertheless, the Framework is more than what the "approach is going be".

De facto, it is the plan. Because NGOs are moving forward, according to Jean-Christophe Adrian of UN-HABITAT, which chairs the "Shelter Cluster" of the 200 or so NGOs working on the housing issue.

"The document represents the consensus,"
Adrian explained.

Phelps notes that the Inter-Ministry Commission on Housing has "seen it and made remarks," but they have never openly approved or disapproved of it, nor has it been made public.

In fact, national government officials have only gone public on one housing project – a plan for 3,000 to 4,000 apartments in the Fort National neighbourhood overlooking Haiti's National Palace.

"It's a project of public housing high-rises, respecting building norms for earthquake zones, which will house many hundreds of families," Jacques Gabriel, Minister of Public Works, told Agence France Presse in January.

But when Minister of Social Affairs Gérald Germain and his bodyguards showed up to place the cornerstone on Jan. 12, they were chased away by angry, homeless protestors.

"We want explanations!"
a man who identified himself as Leguenson told AlterPresse.

Haiti's homeless are not the only ones who want explanations. According to Phelps, the project does not yet have IHRC approval.

Nevertheless, not unlike the lack of coordination and communication sometimes apparent in other sectors, the first stone for the Fort National project was going to be placed even before it received the IHRC's green light.


Or perhaps the Haitian government has decided to skip the IHRC? But according to a decree, it is "responsible for continuously developing and refining development plans for Haiti."

"There are still a lot of questions that have to be worked out," Phelps explained. "The proposal they have made is one that needs some vetting. It's quite expensive."

Shelter Cluster authorities are also sceptical. "Our experience shows us that, in all countries, these types of projects end up benefiting the middle classes. They don't benefit the poorest people," Adrian said.

With authorities bickering, with no high-rise in sight, and with construction and reconstruction only planned for the homeowners, 13 months later, Haiti's poorest earthquake victims are left exactly where they were on Jan. 13, 2010 - in tents and under tarps, living in subhuman conditions, under constant threat of eviction, facing a depleted housing stock with no savings.

(END)

NGOs and the "humanitarian industry"

"In the language of NGOs, Haiti is a 'humanitarian hot spot,' because the NGOs go where the donors go," journalist Linda Polman told a group of reporters in Petion-ville, Haiti recently.

"That's why all these organisations are here. They're waiting for the billions Haiti is just one station on the trip NGOs make. They ask people for money because they say they are going to help… You have to ask them questions. You have to make sure they spend that money on you."

The Dutch author of "The Crisis Caravan - What's Wrong with Humanitarian Aid" took time out from her investigation into Haiti aid to urge Haitian journalists at Radio/Tele Metropole to dig into NGOs and the "humanitarian industry".

"NGOs are part of an international, multinational, multi-billion-dollar industry," she said. "Donor countries give over 130 billion dollars a year."


And that figure doesn't even take into account private donations.

According to Polman, about 37,000 NGOs, mostly from Western countries, work in poor countries. There are probably about 2,000 foreign NGOs in Haiti by her reckoning. And while NGOs say they come to poor countries to "help", that is not the only motivation, she said.

"This is a business, and sometimes they make decisions that are not moral," she noted.

In addition to being in business, they also do foreign policy work. In her book, Polman writes how, in 2001, just weeks after the 9/11 attack, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell told NGO leaders that "American NGOs… NGOs are a force multiplier for us, such an important part of our combat team."

Polman pleaded with journalists to investigate the foreign NGOs in Haiti which – according to many journalist and watchdog groups – are not delivering the quality and quantity of assistance needed.

"Western journalists come and go and that is why it is up to you. Ask the NGOs questions. And if you don't understand, ask and ask again, because it's your money."

*Author Linda Polman's visit to Radio/Tele Metropole was part of an ongoing training organised by the Knight International Journalism Fellow in Haiti.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12744929

16 March 2011 Last updated at 00:02 GMT

Haiti cholera 'far worse than expected', experts fear


By Michelle Roberts - Health reporter, BBC News

The cholera epidemic affecting Haiti looks set to be far worse than officials had thought, experts fear.

Rather than affecting a predicted 400,000 people, the diarrhoeal disease could strike nearly twice as many as this, latest estimates suggest.

Aid efforts will need ramping up, US researchers told The Lancet journal.


The World Health Organization says everything possible is being done to contain the disease and warns that modelling estimates can be inaccurate.

Before last year's devastating earthquake in the Caribbean nation, no cases of cholera had been seen on Haiti for more than a century.

The bacterial disease is spread from person-to-person through contaminated food and water.


It causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting, and patients, particularly children and the elderly, are vulnerable to dangerous dehydration as a result.

Gross underestimate

In the three months between October and December 2010, about 150,000 people in Haiti contracted cholera and about 3,500 died.

Around this time, the United Nations projected that the total number infected would likely rise to 400,000.

But researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, say this is a gross underestimate.


They believe the toll could reach 779,000, with 11,100 deaths by the end of November 2011.

Dr Sanjay Basu and colleagues reached their figures using data from Haiti's ministry of health.

They say the UN estimates were "crude" and based on "a simple assumption" that the disease would infect a set portion (2-4%) of Haiti's 10 million population.

Dr Basu's calculations take into account factors like which water supplies have been contaminated and how much immunity the population has to the disease.

They predict the number of cholera cases will be substantially higher than official estimates.

"The epidemic is not likely to be short-term," said Dr Basu. "It is going to be larger than predicted in terms of sheer numbers and will last far longer than the initial projections."

But the researchers say thousands of lives could be saved by provision of clean water, vaccination and expanded access to antibiotics.

A spokesman for the World Health Organization said: "We have to be cautious because modelling does not necessarily reflect what's seen on the ground.

"Latest figures show there have been 252,640 cases and 4,672 deaths as of 10 March 2011.

"We really need to reconstruct water and sanitation systems for the cholera epidemic to go away completely.


"It's a long-term process and cholera is going to be around for a number of years yet."
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12798654

20 March 2011 Last updated at 21:44 GMT

Haitians elect president in delayed second round

Haitians have been voting in the delayed run-off of the presidential election, amid an ongoing struggle to rebuild after last year's earthquake.

On the ballot papers are pop star Michel Martelly, and academic and former first lady Mirlande Manigat.

The poll is being held just two days after former president Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned from seven years in exile in South Africa.

Final results are not expected until mid-April.

Haitians have a choice between two markedly different candidates: Mirlande Manigat is a 70-year-old academic and wife of a former president, while Michel Martelly, 50, is a singer and entertainer known to his fans as "Sweet Micky". They emerged after recounts and challenges as the top two from November's chaotic first round, which was marred by violence and fraud.

Turnout

Whoever wins will face a mammoth challenge.

Haiti is struggling to rebuild after the devastating January 2010 earthquake, with some 800,000 people still living in camps.

The country has also been suffering a cholera epidemic that is likely to flare up again with the start of the rainy season in a few weeks.

International donors are looking for the next president to help restore some stability and be a partner they can work with.

One key factor will be how many of the 4.7 million eligible voters will cast their ballots. Only 23% votes in the first round, adding to the accusations of fraud.

Low turnout or even a boycott by supporters of Mr Aristide, who returned home on Friday, could undermine the poll's legitimacy, correspondents say.

Speaking to hundreds of his supporters at the airport, Mr Aristide criticised the exclusion of his party, Fanmi Lavalas, from the elections, which are also for the country's legislature.

Mr Aristide received a tumultuous welcome from his supporters. "The exclusion of Fanmi Lavalas is the exclusion of the majority of Haitians," he said. The party was barred apparently because of technical errors on its application forms.

The former priest, who was forced into exile in 2004 amid a rebellion, has said he will not re-enter politics and has so far not endorsed either of the candidates.

Under Haiti's election law, the Provisional Electoral Council is due to announce preliminary results on 31 March, with the final results confirmed on 16 April.

The top United National official in Haiti, Edmund Mulet, acknowledged that the long wait for results could stir up rival supporters as each claimed victory.

However, Mr Mulet said he believed there would be a credible outcome.

"This is the first time in Haitian history that they will have a run-off election, a second round, so I think the product of this election will be a legitimate one that will have the support of the majority of the Haitian people and that alone is already an asset for the next government," he told Reuters news agency.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12966875

5 April 2011 Last updated at 08:54 GMT

Haiti: Michel Martelly 'defeats' Mirlande Manigat

Musician Michel "Sweet Micky" Martelly is the winner of Haiti's presidential run-off, according to official preliminary results.

Figures indicate he secured more than two-thirds of the vote, beating former first lady Mirlande Manigat.

If the results are confirmed on 16 April, Mr Martelly, 50, will succeed President Rene Preval, who has been in office for five years.

Haiti is still struggling after the 2010 earthquake and a cholera epidemic.

Turnout in the second round was high and voting was largely peaceful, although still marred by fraud.

Correspondents say that although a period of appeal must be observed until 16 April, the wide margin between the rival candidates means Mr Martelly's win is all but assured.

After the preliminary results were announced, thousands of Mr Martelly's supporters took to the streets of Port-au-Prince, dancing and cheering. Witnesses said some fired automatic rifles into the air.

Although the celebrations were peaceful, the US embassy urged its citizens to "stay indoors and avoid large crowds for tonight".

The singer made no public statements but thanked his supporters via Twitter, adding: "We're going to work for all Haitians. Together we can."

He is due to hold a news conference on Tuesday.

The BBC's Andy Gallacher says that if Mr Martelly - who has promised change for the Haitian people - becomes the next president, he will face some serious challenges.

Hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors still live in squalid tent cities as the cholera outbreak which has killed thousands remains out of control.

Mr Martelly is politically inexperienced but his message of reform appealed to Haiti's poor and unemployed, our correspondent adds.


Fatal shootings

Mr Martelly benefited from the support of five candidates eliminated in the first round. Fellow musician Wyclef Jean, whose own candidacy was ruled invalid, also backed Mr Martelly.

The run-off vote was supposed to have taken place in January but was delayed.

Observers said the second round was much better organised than the first in November, when turnout was only 23%.

Jude Celestin, who had the backing of outgoing President Preval, was initially placed second in the first round but withdrew from the race after international monitors found there had been widespread fraud in his favour.

Two people were shot dead during second-round voting in clashes between rival political factions in different rural areas.

The electoral commission extended voting by an hour because some polling stations were missing voting materials.

But the head of the commission said at the time that reports of irregularities would have "no impact on the electoral process as a whole".

Mr Preval's mandate formally ended on 7 February but he has parliamentary approval to stay in office until 14 May.


Text-TV from Swedish TV channel SVT, Danish TV channels DR1 and TV2 News + German TV channel ZDF:

50-year-old singer & musician Michel Martelly won the presidential election in Haiti - held on 20 March 2011.

Martelly achieved 67.6% of the votes after having promised CHANGE. His rival, the former first lady Mirlande Manigat got 37.7% of the votes according to the official preliminary election result on Monday.

The votes will be recounted before Martelly can be declared the final winner. The final result will be published on Saturday 16 April 2011.

Haitians have suffered from poverty and corruption. The earthquake in January 2010 made life even harder for the Haitians.

The international community has pledged $10 billion in aid to HAITI.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13163550

21 April 2011 Last updated at 17:43 GMT Share this pageEmail Print

Michel Martelly officially declared Haitian president

Popular Haitian singer Michel Martelly has been officially declared the next president of Haiti.

Official results showed Mr Martelly won 67.6% of the vote in the run-off on 20 March, defeating former first lady Mirlande Manigat.

Speaking after the results were made public, Mr Martelly said he would seek to work in harmony with the opposition, following an election marred by violent protests and accusations of fraud.

He will take office on 14 May.

Deadly protests

Just hours after he was declared the winner, Mr Martelly tried to rally support through his Twitter account.

"Let's pick up our tools and get to work to clean up our country," he tweeted.

But despite Mr Martelly's calls for unity, there have been several violent incidents in a number of Haitian cities.

A spokesman for the United Nations police force, which patrols much of Haiti, said demonstrators had set fire to a government building in Belladere in central Haiti.

Protests also took place in Leogane, south of Port-au-Prince. At least one person is reported to have been killed.

The protests followed the release by the electoral commission of some results of the legislative elections, which were held on the same day as the presidential run-off.

The results suggest that outgoing President Rene Preval's ruling INITE (Unity) party will remain the DOMINANT FORCE in the Haitian legislature, although it seems to have lost its parliamentary majority.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13173055

22 April 2011 Last updated at 20:53 GMT

US seeks Haiti election explanation amid fraud concerns

The United States embassy in Haiti has said it is worried about possible fraud in recent legislative elections there.

In a statement, the embassy said the Haitian government and the country's provisional electoral commission needed to explain why a number of candidates won seats in the final results, when they hadn't been leading in preliminary counts.

Of 18 such cases, it said, 16 favoured the governing Unity party - known in Haiti as Inite - of the outgoing President, Rene Preval.

Haiti's President-elect, Michel Martelly, has called for an investigation into the results and urged Mr Preval not to ratify them.

Mr Martelly, a popular Haitian singer, won the presidency in a run-off election, with over two-thirds of the vote. But his party has won only a handful of seats in the incoming legislature.

So if he is to get much-needed legislation passed, he will have to work alongside the Unity party, which will dominate the new legislature.

It will have an absolute majority in the 30-seat Senate. And it is very close to an absolute majority in the lower house, which has 99 seats.

Haitians 'deserve nothing less'

The US Embassy in the capital Port-au-Prince queried the swings in 17 seats in the lower house, and one in the Senate.

It asked why one winning candidate from the incumbent party - who had been in third place after the preliminary count - gained 55,000 votes, going "from 90,000 in the preliminary results to more than 145,000 in the final results."

It also called for international election observers to review the 18 cases to ensure the results were fair. "The Haitian people, who have participated with great patience in the two rounds of elections, deserve nothing less," the embassy states.

Mr Martelly, who will be sworn in as president next month, has also criticised the results.

"The results of the presidential elections matched the people's will," he said in a radio broadcast. "But the results in the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate seem wrong. It seems the people's vote was not respected."
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
HAITI HAS GOT A NEW PRESIDENT - ELECTED BY THE HAITIAN PEOPLE

Today, the Haitian singer Michel Martelly was sworn in as Haiti's new president after Réné Préval.

Michel martelly was primarily supported by Haiti's analphabets and by poor Haitians hoping for CHANGE.

Haiti has a past of revolts and dictatorships (Duvalier). In January 2010, Haiti was hit by one of the worst earthquakes ever in Haiti's history devastating the poor Caribbean country.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
Hash-smoking pop president gains power in Haiti (free paper Urban on 6.4.11 + niry:berlingske.dk)

50-year-old Michel Martelly is most known for his past as a crack and hash smoking musician. But the population loves him, and now he has been elected president in Haiti with 68% of the votes.

He had to leave the army after having made the general's daughter pregnant.

He has released 14 records within the genre kompa - dance music sung in Creole.

His election campaign focused on a crusade against the widespread corruption in Haiti, on agricultural reforms and on restoration of the military.

In an interview, he has said: I think that my past is my strength. By electing me, the voters know what they get - it is open - it is public - it is on YouTube".
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13555743

26 May 2011 Last updated at 03:50 GMT

Haiti: Daniel-Gerard Rouzier attacks earthquake panel

Haiti's prime minister-designate, Daniel-Gerard Rouzier, has said he wants to replace the "dysfunctional" quake reconstruction commission.

The commission, co-chaired by former US President Bill Clinton, has been criticised as too slow.

In an interview with AP, Mr Rouzier said he hoped Bill Clinton would remain active in helping rebuild Haiti.

The agency was set up after the 2010 earthquake to assure foreign donors their funds would not be misspent.

Outgoing Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive is the other co-chair of the commission.

The countries that have contributed the most to rebuilding after the devastating earthquake, including the US, France and Japan, are also represented on the commission.

Bill Clinton has expressed his frustration at the slow pace of reconstruction in Haiti, but in January, one year after the earthquake, he said the speed of the effort was picking up.

A recent US government report criticised the commission for delays in its work.

'Tremendous vision'

The 7.0-magnitude earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 killed more than 250,000 people, made about two million people homeless and wrecked large parts of the capital, Port-au-Prince.

Sixteen months on, hundreds of thousands of people are still living in tent cities.

Mr Rouzier was appointed prime minister by new President Michel Martelly and is awaiting senate confirmation of his role.

Mr Rouzier called the 27-member reconstruction commission "dysfunctional" and said it would be replaced by a government agency.

"What I can tell you is that the [commission] as it exists today will not continue," he told the Associated Press.

"I don't mean to crucify the people who came up with the concept. But sometimes when something doesn't work you have to fix it."

He said he would like Mr Clinton, who is also a UN envoy to Haiti, to remain active in the country's reconstruction.

"When you have someone of Clinton's calibre, this is a man of tremendous vision... We have to pick his brain and make sure that we have the right strategy."

Mr Rouzier is a US-educated businessman who runs several companies in Haiti, including a car dealership and an electric power company.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
Text-TV from Danish TV station DR1 and Swedish SVT: The DEATH TOLL in HAITI after the devastating earthquake in January 2010 might rather be between 46,000 and 85,000 and not the official one - 250,000. This according to an examination made at the request of the relief organization USAID.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
HAITI: NEW OUTBREAK OF CHOLERA

More than 10 people died and thousand(s) were hospitalized after new outbreak of cholera around the capital - Port-au-Prince.

310,000 have been infected and 5,332 have died since last year's outbreak of cholera.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
NEWS IN RELATION TO HAITI ON 3.6.11

CHOLERA WARNING IN HAITI: DEATH TOLL SINCE OUTBREAK IN OCTOBER 2010 RISEN TO 5,337

The cholera death toll in Haiti since the outbreak 7 months ago has risen to 5,337 until the end of May according to Haiti's Department of Health. By each day, 6 more dies, and 550 are infected. The Relief organization Doctors without Borders (Medecins sans frontières / MSF) has also recorded a significant increase of the cholera cases.

Since October 2010, 320,000 Haitians have been infected with cholera.

From Swedish text-TV /SVT.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-13689711

7 June 2011 Last updated at 17:42 GMT

Haiti: Port-au-Prince flooding kills at least 11 people

At least 11 people have been killed in the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, after torrential rain caused floods and landslides.

Two children were buried alive when their home collapsed and two people died in a tent city erected after last year's devastating earthquake.

Haitian officials said other such camps could be swept away as the hurricane season got under way.

The Dominican Republic and Jamaica have also issued flood alerts.

Days of heavy rain swelled rivers and flooded camps built to house thousands of evacuees after the 2010 earthquake.

The United States National Hurricane Center warned the rains could cause flash floods and mudslides in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Cuba.

Haitian President Michel Martelly said he would visit Port-au-Prince's worst-hit neighbourhood, Cite Soleil.

"I'm now trying to help people and distribute some food, I hope people can find shelter," President Martelly said.

Some camps reported flooding of up to 1.2m (4ft).

Meteorologists forecast more heavy rain for Tuesday night, increasing fears that already sodden hillsides could collapse.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
GERMAN MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS - GUIDO WESTERWELLE - PLEDGES HAITI GERMAN AID

18 months after the earthquake disaster in HAITI, the German minister of foreign affairs - Guido Westerwelle - has pledged Haiti further German aid. "We will not forget Haiti".

Westerwelle is expected in Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince for a short visit.

In January 2010, more than 220,000 people were killed by an earthquake.

Despite international aid, rebuilding has only made little progress.


Haiti also suffers from a CHOLERA EPIDEMIC which has already claimed more than 5,600 Haitian lives.
 

nancyk58

Up&Up
Coldplayer
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
29,337
HAITI THREATENED BY POWERFUL TROPICAL STORM "EMILY"

The authorities in Haiti encourages the inhabitants to evacuations and to seek shelter as a storm approaches.

According to the US Hurricane Center, the tropical storm EMILY is threatening i.a. Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

Haiti's leading meteorologist, Ronald Semelfort, says that torrential rain may hit Haiti late Wednesday.

It is dangerous for Haiti which is still fighting the devastation caused by the powerful earthquake in January 2010 that killed at least 225,000 people.

(Danish text-tv on DR1 and TV2 News)
 
Top