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28-Mar-09: Emirates Palace, Abu Dhabi, UAE - Tickets, Previews, Meetups, Reviews, Setlists, Photos/V

Jenjie

Coldplaying Founder
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Coldplay and rubbish bags in Abu Dhabi.

Top performance by Cold Play in the grounds of the 7 star Emirates Palace last night. Dug the surreal lightening display that went on throughout the gig. Guess it was Gods way of saying, ‘Stuff Earth Hour I don’t turn my lights off for no one.’ Unfortunately with the lightening came rain. I don’t mind rain at an outdoor gig especially in the Middle East because it’s warm rain. It’s warm like the water the hairdresser uses to wash your hair. You know how they hold the little nozzle under their hand till the temp is just perfect and then they start washing? In the Middle East the rain god does the same thing before he dumps a deluge on you. Millions of little drops of urine temperature water plopping down on you. Back in the 90’s at the one-day cricket at Eden Park, before they banned booze sales in the second innings, you did used to feel the same thing, except it was drops of urine falling out of the sky. Well, out of the cups of the guy’s 12 rows back.
No, I don’t mind rain but some people do. They mind it so much in fact that they would rather wear rubbish bags than get wet. Who started that retarded trend? Which genius decided to cut holes for arms and head and throw on a plastic bag? Probably a pissed guy who was trying to dress up as a homeless guy for a joke. But it caught on! Do concert goers read the weather report and think ‘Might be chance of rain. Better put a giant rubbish bag in my pocket? The Cold Play concert was carbon neutral apparently. I guess the thousands of rubbish bags on their way to the landfill today don’t count.
Great gig from a top band but the sound seemed a bit crap for a while. There was this staticky hiss in the air. Then I realized it was the sound of hundreds of rubbish bag wearing plonkers rustling in time to the songs.

http://petervegas.blogspot.com/2009/03/coldplay-and-rubbish-bags-in-abu-dhabi.html
 

Jayzo

♥ under the Osaka ☀
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No, I don’t mind rain but some people do. They mind it so much in fact that they would rather wear rubbish bags than get wet. Who started that retarded trend? Which genius decided to cut holes for arms and head and throw on a plastic bag? Probably a pissed guy who was trying to dress up as a homeless guy for a joke. But it caught on! Do concert goers read the weather report and think ‘Might be chance of rain. Better put a giant rubbish bag in my pocket? The Cold Play concert was carbon neutral apparently. I guess the thousands of rubbish bags on their way to the landfill today don’t count.
Great gig from a top band but the sound seemed a bit crap for a while. There was this staticky hiss in the air. Then I realized it was the sound of hundreds of rubbish bag wearing plonkers rustling in time to the songs.
Hahaha, I'm sorry but I totally cracked up at that, hilarious :laugh4: :laugh4: :laugh4:.
 

Lore

Up&Up
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awww she's so lucky, I'd love to see them live at my birthday but guess where they'll be in july ... the US :p
 

but a dream

Crazy love giraffe.
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awww she's so lucky, I'd love to see them live at my birthday but guess where they'll be in july ... the US :p
Gaaaaah.

Coldplay :whip:




We'll celebrate it for you here Lore :D





Back to concert, I loved that vid :nice:
 

Lore

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the audio of the yellow vid is awesome, probably rich people has awesome cameras :lol:
 

Cris_Santos

Livin' life in Technicolor
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the audio of the yellow vid is awesome, probably rich people has awesome cameras :lol:
:lol:

Don't think my chances of seeing them on my bday are very high either... Christmas day :p
 

Lore

Up&Up
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:lol: good point!

but heyyy you get the christmas messages :cheesy:
 

busybeeburns

mr coldplaying himself
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15k fans brave rains to watch Coldplay in Abu Dhabi



Abu Dhabi: The atmosphere was electric, alright.

With thousand-volt lightning streaking across the sombre skies, a group of four took to the stage in their marching band outfits to sing about Violet Hill, with Eugene Delacroix’s symbolist painting: Liberty Leading the People, unfolding in the background.

The heavy skies soon opened up pouring rain over the 15,000 fans who had come to see Coldplay in their first concert in the UAE on Saturday [March 28] at the Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi.

The rain, the thunder and the lightning combined with the blue-green laser lights and humongous balloons wading through the air to create a surreal backdrop.

On the last leg of their world tour to promote their fourth album Viva La Vida or Death And All His Friends, Coldplay belted out hits such as Yellow, The Scientist, Fix You, Clocks and In My Place from their previous three albums, alongside other tracks like Green Eyes, Shiver and The Hardest Part.

From their latest album, the obvious favourite was cover song Viva La Vida with the crowds joining in the chorus as lead vocalist Chris Martin swaggered around the stage and across the protruding ramp which divided the VIP stands into two, bringing Coldplay closer to fans who were at the back.

Martin couldn’t help joking about seeing rain in a ‘desert country’.

Coldplay also showcased new tracks such as Lost, 42 and Lovers of Japan, which was played against a rolled-down backdrop video of Japan. As the crowd began applauding, Martin sprung out a Wagasa (a Japanese parasol) and broke into a frenzied dance before the crowds were showered with thousands of little paper butterflies; just like in the video.

Sixteen year old Samar who was having the time of his life, said, “We felt like we were floating in the air while listening to them. Coldplay makes you forget about all your problems; they take you into another world…”

An old-school wooden-framed television placed next to the piano on stage was beaming live images from the concert and clips from their music videos.

As the rains died down and a cool wind wafted over the concert-venue, Coldplay mimicked the weather with their romantic guitar riffs and vibrating drum sounds.

The musicians constantly interacted with their fans and also went on to say that the Abu Dhabi crowd ranked as their number one to date.

A lucky birthday girl got to go on stage and join Martin on the keyboards for a solo performance of the song ‘The Hardest Part’

Since Earth Hour 2009 also coincided with their concert, the band who are known to be environmentally-friendly, requested the organisers to switch off all lights in the arena for five minutes to commemorate the event. A multitude of cellphone lights lit up the arena, the musicians went on to do a cover of Neil Diamond’s I’m a Believer.

Scott Hallsworth, a British expatriate, who had braved the rains with his wife and infant baby in a stroller, to watch the band perform, said, “I’ve attended Coldplay’s concert in London, but this one was much better than that. Coldplay is famous for their brilliant stage productions and they stayed true to form. The weather did not bother us; it actually complemented the atmosphere of the concert,” he said.

Martin then joked about the early formation of the band, and made drummer and backing vocalist Will Champion perform, to prove that the band would not have been the same, had he been the lead vocalist – all in good humour.

As the curtains came down, the band bowed out in front of a roaring audience with a humble ‘Shukran’. However, the crowds were not in the mood to call it a night.

As Coldplay retired backstage, the thousands of fans began to hum Viva La Vida – an unusual way to urge the band to come back on stage as compared to the usual ‘once more’.
Despite a few minutes passing by and no sign of Coldplay, the crowds continued singing hoping that the band would come back on stage one last time.

And they did…........

http://www.xpress4me.com/
 

ifpikad

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Singing in the Rain was played as an outro to Glasses of Water. I'm still trying to figure out where the Raindrops out was but I think it was after 42.
 

busybeeburns

mr coldplaying himself
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Coldplay play Abu Dhabi

A navy hoody pulled up over his blonde curls, trying his best to go undetected, Coldplay's Chris Martin mooched across a half-built arena ahead of the UK band's first concert in the Middle East.

Barefoot and boardshort-clad, the world famous frontman oozed calmth, in direct contrast to the 100-strong work force beavering away to get Emirates Palace ready for the 15,000 hungry fans due to descend on the venue in a matter of hours. The concert, the final stop on Coldplay's Viva La Vida world tour, was timed perfectly to coincide with the globally-marked environmental initiative Earth Hour, something close to the band's hearts, as they explained to tabloid! just hours before the concert.

"When we support something, we prefer to support it whole-heartedly and not just put our name on the can," said drummer Will Champion.

"It's not good to spread yourself too thin, especially when it comes to things which require so much effort and energy to get right. We all made a pact a long time ago we would never put our faces to campaigns unless we truly believed we had the time to really make people believe in them too."

Despite Coldplay's worldwide popularity, the band has remained protective of their music, refusing its use for product endorsements. "We are lucky enough to have a platform where people actually listen to us and it's important to us we use it correctly and to the benefit of the rest of the world," continued Champion. "We agreed we would use the platform to do some good in the world and make people aware of things which could help the planet instead of just doing something to make us more money."

As lead guitarist Jonny Buckland and Martin continued a sound check, bass guitarist Guy Berryman explained why the band are so environmentally-conscious. "It's all about the world really, isn't it?" he said with a look of sincerity. "Don't get me wrong, these concerts do use a lot of energy but that comes with the territory. But we try and be as environmentally aware and kind as we can be - our album covers are printed on recycled paper and for every 100 made we plant trees around the world. Every little bit helps, as the people at Tesco so rightly keep telling us," he said with a wink and a smile.

Active supporters of various social and political causes, such as Oxfam's Make Trade Fair campaign and Amnesty International, the guys said they were "stoked" the concert organisers had agreed to make their concert the first carbon-offset event in the Middle East. "It's really important to us, and it's also good people understand and are educated about the damage our own carbon footprint can do to the world we live in," Champion said.

Opening with one of their more recent singles, Violet Hill, Martin quickly won over his audience with lively banter, peppered with a few greetings in Arabic. "Four boys, with slightly more hair and a fair bit thinner, decided to practice for 12 years and then go and play a concert in Abu Dhabi in the rain," Martin said as the crowd went wild. "We've finally made it here and we are so happy. Our goal has been realised."

Making it to the Middle East was something Champion said the band had always strived for. With family currently living in Dubai, he said he was looking forward to his father coming to the gig. "We never imagined we'd ever make it and be able to play in a place like the UAE," he said. "If you'd asked me 10 years ago, I don't think I ever would have believed we'd be here today. It is an honour and we are so happy to be here in the Middle East."

Champion's father may have been in the crowd, but this time his wife and young children couldn't be here - something the guys say they always find hard when on tour. "Touring is fun, but it can be a challenge too. You miss family and friends and you also miss being in the studio.

"It's weird actually, but when you're on tour you just want to be at home and when you're at home all you can think about is getting back on the road again," said Berryman. "Tour life has certainly changed for us mainly due to the fact we are all fathers now," added Champion with a smile. "We all have babies and youngsters and that just changes everything. Chris's eldest is five and mine is three - they are just starting to really understand what Daddy does and it's so incredible to see them grow and learn. Songs come on the radio and you watch them recognise the tunes and look up at you. I'm sure they'll be a few opinions which will start to shine through very soon which will be interesting. My little one came to her first concert in Australia and she really enjoyed it. It was very special for me. The wives and kids are often around depending on the tour dates and locations. They come and go as they please, which is nice."

With three single show dates to end the tour in Hong Kong, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, Coldplay has also recently spent time playing in Australia to raise money for the victims of the recent bushfires. "Australia was a slightly different kettle of fish because we were there for something so special," said Champion. "It was wonderful to be asked to play the victims of the bushfires and meant so much to all of us. Chris actually had the chance to get out to the area where some of the fire hit and said it was so moving."

But their UAE concert was to support another cause - Earth Hour, which encourages people across the globe to switch off unnecessary lights and electricity for one hour to raise awareness about - and counteract the effects of - climate change. Martin ordered the lights to be switched off while the band played an acoustic set amid a mass of mobile phone lights only.

This year's Earth Hour aims to encourage one billion "vote earth" votes and make a difference - something Martin says starts with each individual. A show full of surprises with everything from giant, spinning globes suspended from a rig or paper butterflies blasted into the air, to yellow balloons thrown into the crowd during their hit song Yellow - the performance kept everyone guessing - something Berryman warned us about earlier that day."We wrote, designed and planned the whole show from start to finish so everything you saw up there was all us," he said. "It took us about four weeks to design and then about four weeks to really perfect the show while we were on tour in America. We tweaked bits and pieces and then to be honest it hasn't changed at all since then. It's perfect."

Berryman said the show was even more special here for a few other reasons. "The concert here is the very first show of the tour we have done outdoors which makes it very fresh and exciting for us. Different scenery and the fresh air - we just have to pray the rain holds off."

Clearly nobody was looking down on the guys as the heavens opened and the lightning provided a dramatic backdrop to the set. But somehow the weather added to the electric atmosphere, the audience and band pulling together in the face of adversity. "I can't believe it's raining in a country where it rains once every 10 years," shouted Martin. "But stick with us and we'll make it through together guys."

And he made it worth their while, effortlessly weaving in humorous tunes such as Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head and Rain, Rain Go Away into the band's famous hits, including Fix You and Clocks.

Out on the town

Guy Berryman told tabloid! that one of the downsides of touring was that they didn't get to see much of the cities they were visiting. "With Hong Kong, Singapore and the UAE in a week you basically just give up on time zones. You cross so many you just sleep when you're tired and stay awake when you're not. It's crazy, but lots of fun too. The bad thing is we don't get to see much of the place we are in."

But tabloid! spies tell us that they were able to squeeze in a night at Emirates Palace's Etoiles nightclub, following the Andrea Bocelli concert on Friday. They were also spotted handing out free tickets to a few lucky people they met that night.

http://archive.gulfnews.com









 

Mimixxx

If we could float away...
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A truly storming show for Coldplay



The Coldplay frontman Chris Martin was charmingly apologetic, as if the rain was his fault. “I know this is extremely terrible weather,” he bellowed from the Emirates Palace stage on Saturday night.

But in fact, the rain never mattered. The British foursome bounced on stage with sparklers, opening their storming Middle Eastern debut with the instrumental Life in Technicolor from their last album, Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends, followed by Violet Hill from the same album. From the happy enthusiasm shown by the band, you would never have guessed it’s a show that they’ve already performed more than 100 times worldwide. As forks of lightening streaked the sky, a sodden, enraptured audience of 15,000 whooped back at them.

Musically, it was a strong, well-constructed set list of upbeat new tracks from the recent album, produced in part by Brian Eno, along with a smattering of oldies. Having worked their way through Clocks and In My Place, it was during a rendition of the band’s early hit Yellow that the rain really started coming down. Martin looked disbelievingly skywards and laughed with his three band mates, the guitarist Jonny Buckland, the bassist Guy Berryman and the drummer Will Champion. “I’m singing in the rain,” he quipped. Three giant orbs twirled above their heads, yellow balloons floated across the stage and a backdrop of multicoloured laser beams shone out into the audience.

It wasn’t a mere visual spectacle, however. From start to finish of nearly two hours of music, it was a magnificent effort in which the crowd were given a true taste of Chris Martin, the entertainer. He didn’t just sing. He also played the guitar, tinkled on the piano, cracked jokes at the audience and apologised for his bad Arabic before, at one moment, swaying around while puffing into a harmonica. All of this while skipping around stage, sweat pouring down his face. “We’re staying in a palace,” he said incredulously while waving his hand at the hotel behind him, seeming genuinely grateful to be there.

As he launched into a soaring rendition of Fix You, the rain stopped and the crowd were encouraged to sing along. Martin flung his Sergeant Pepper jacket out into the audience before launching into the opening guitar chords of Strawberry Swing, an Afropop influenced track that Martin attributes to Zimbabwe, where his mother grew up. “It’s such a perfect day,” he sang as the crowd collectively wiped rain water from their eyes.

The highlight, for one girl, came when Martin called her up on stage for a birthday treat. Having moved to a platform in front of the stage while frantic bodies mopped the equipment behind him, Martin invited the 23-year-old Sarah to sit beside him while he played the piano through The Hardest Part. “Just turn the pages,” he said. “I probably don’t smell so good but just sit back and relax. I’ll do all the singing.”

For others in the audience, their moment came when the four moved to a small platform in the middle of the standing section. “Remember, it’s Earth Hour,” instructed Martin as the lights went off and a sea of mobile phones and cameras were held up instead while the four swept through The Monkees’ I’m A Believer. Champion left his drums and took over for Martin with a rare vocal performance of Death Will Never Conquer, a song penned during writing sessions for Viva La Vida or Death And All His Friends but which never made it on to the album.

The evening’s pinnacle came just afterwards, when having moved back to the main stage and performed Politik, the band struck up their wistful anthem to the East, Lovers in Japan. To a screened backdrop of Japanese images, thousands of multicoloured paper butterflies showered down on the audience. It was a truly breathtaking moment.

Tricky, therefore, to follow it up, but this they did with aplomb, performing the lullaby-like Death and All His Friends before taking a bow and leaving the stage. A brief encore, including The Scientist, was swept through before Martin had one final parting shot for the grateful crowd. “The ratings are back,” he said, “And we’ve played a few gigs, but the Abu Dhabi is audience number one.” On such a night, we happily believed him.

http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090330/ART/68134612/1007
 

ifpikad

New Coldplayer
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Singing in the Rain

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=marYkj8hkys"]YouTube - Singing in the Rain - Coldplay in Abu Dhabi[/ame]
 
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