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  1. #16  
    If we could float away... Mimixxx's Avatar
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    Yeah, the fact that a company who does need the money, desperately, have spoken out and said it was a bad idea speaks volumes though.

    Would be interesting to find out if it was Adele or her record company that kept 21 off Spotify. Then again she's not as established as Coldplay.

    The curious thing is though, that as far back as I can remember, whenever CP have been asked about illegal downloads and leaks and the such they've always been nonplussed and maintained that that's just the way things work these days. Which makes this decision even more baffling since Spotify is LEGAL.

    Kudos to whoever is pulling their strings, they've managed to develop quite a pull over 5 extremely well educated, grown men.
    M





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  2. #17  
    Coldplayer fakfak's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ApproximatelyInfinite;5065765
    Unsure how I feel about this, really. Yeah, it sounds like Spotify gives a pretty raw deal in terms of royalties for streaming, but services like Spotify help to keep illegal piracy down (nothing could ever stop it, but it does help). I feel like if I were Coldplay, I'd rather get pennies for what's streamed rather than nothing at all for filesharing, but what do I know.

    Also, I'm probably mistaken, but I SWEAR that MX was streamed on Spotify at least temporarily--I saw a bunch of friends listening to it on release day popping up all over my Facebook news feed!




    IMHO it probably comes down to principal than anything else. Coldplay sold around a million records last week. They're not in a position where they need to grasp at every revenue stream, therefore can make decisions based on other principles. The bottom line is streaming revenues are so low that even the most streamed artists make essentially no money from the streaming (almost the same as illegal downloading), yet the ridiculously low streaming royalty allows companies like Spotify to act all righteous as though they're saving the music industry, when the reality is the difference between most bands' financial situations with and without streaming is negligible. Frankly, I can see how artists might be tempted to give a f**k you to spotify and other companies like it. Spotify's pitch to bands (and labels) earlier this year was that they NEEDED streaming services to be viable. Coldplay just proved that they don't (at least not bands on their commercial level.)
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  3. #18  
    Coldplayer fakfak's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mimixxx;5066116
    Yeah, the fact that a company who does need the money, desperately, have spoken out and said it was a bad idea speaks volumes though.

    Would be interesting to find out if it was Adele or her record company that kept 21 off Spotify. Then again she's not as established as Coldplay.

    The curious thing is though, that as far back as I can remember, whenever CP have been asked about illegal downloads and leaks and the such they've always been nonplussed and maintained that that's just the way things work these days. Which makes this decision even more baffling since Spotify is LEGAL.

    Kudos to whoever is pulling their strings, they've managed to develop quite a pull over 5 extremely well educated, grown men.




    There's a difference between accepting the reality of a certain amount of illegal downloading, and essentially being insulted by having you work valued at so little. I suspect pride is a huge motivating factor in so many artists who otherwise embrace digital music having ill feelings about streaming services.
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  4. #19  
    a thousand houses long ApproximatelyInfinite's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fakfak;5066216
    IMHO it probably comes down to principal than anything else. Coldplay sold around a million records last week. They're not in a position where they need to grasp at every revenue stream, therefore can make decisions based on other principles. The bottom line is streaming revenues are so low that even the most streamed artists make essentially no money from the streaming (almost the same as illegal downloading), yet the ridiculously low streaming royalty allows companies like Spotify to act all righteous as though they're saving the music industry, when the reality is the difference between most bands' financial situations with and without streaming is negligible. Frankly, I can see how artists might be tempted to give a f**k you to spotify and other companies like it. Spotify's pitch to bands (and labels) earlier this year was that they NEEDED streaming services to be viable. Coldplay just proved that they don't (at least not bands on their commercial level.)


    This is a very good point, about them being in a position to decide things on principle alone. I guess I'm just unconvinced that their business team would willingly pass up an opportunity to make more money in any way, because they seem to me like they're quite eager to make as much as they can off the Coldplay cash cow. But like I say--I'm a 20-something with a laptop and a degree in media

    I guess I'm also thinking of it in idealistic terms as well: though I'm not kept up at night by people pirating music, and though most bands (Coldplay included) make it clear they're not either, I do buy into the idea that services like Spotify have some impact on legal vs. illegal ways of consuming music and at least have the potential to start to shift music consumer practices over time. Besides the royalty aspect, the idea of listening to music through new and legal means appeals to me, and I would think it would appeal to artists as well, given the alternative. But at the end of the day, the alternative is probably always going to reign and they're probably aware of that.

    But I know one day, good things are coming our way

    M A L C J

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  5. #20  
    Coldplayer fakfak's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ApproximatelyInfinite;5066232
    This is a very good point, about them being in a position to decide things on principle alone. I guess I'm just unconvinced that their business team would willingly pass up an opportunity to make more money in any way, because they seem to me like they're quite eager to make as much as they can off the Coldplay cash cow. But like I say--I'm a 20-something with a laptop and a degree in media

    I guess I'm also thinking of it in idealistic terms as well: though I'm not kept up at night by people pirating music, and though most bands (Coldplay included) make it clear they're not either, I do buy into the idea that services like Spotify have some impact on legal vs. illegal ways of consuming music and at least have the potential to start to shift music consumer practices over time. Besides the royalty aspect, the idea of listening to music through new and legal means appeals to me, and I would think it would appeal to artists as well, given the alternative. But at the end of the day, the alternative is probably always going to reign and they're probably aware of that.



    I think for whatever reason, someone in the band's camp just doesn't like these services. Looking at the MX promotion alone, digital channels have played a huge role (as they did for VLVODAAHF before it.), so it's obvious they're not averse to digital distribution itself. Personally, I don't really see why there's so much fuss over this as up until about a year ago, I subscribed to Rhapsody, and there were always major artists missing from their library (or with less than there full body of work available.) I don't know if it's still the case, but at that time Radiohead wasn't even available and they're widely regarded as the most fully embracing "big band" as far as digital music goes.
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  6. #21  
    a thousand houses long ApproximatelyInfinite's Avatar
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    I just think that it's more of a big deal in the press etc now because streaming services are more relevant than they were a few years ago, especially with Spotify becoming available in the US this year. Six months ago, most Americans had no idea what that was, and now there's a huge number of American subscribers, which is a huge, huge chunk of the music market.

    But I know one day, good things are coming our way

    M A L C J

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  7. #22  
    Coldplayer fakfak's Avatar
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    Rhapsody's been around for almost 10 years and has a much bigger subscriber base than Spotify, so I'm not sure about bigger, but Spotify has certainly garnered more media attention than any other streaming service.
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  8. #23  
    a thousand houses long ApproximatelyInfinite's Avatar
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    Yeah, with all the press about Spotify maybe being able to "save" the record industry (which I partly believe it has the potential to do), I think that's the difference. I don't know the stats on Rhapsody or anything, but I don't think they were heralded as the savior of anything, so I guess that's it

    But I know one day, good things are coming our way

    M A L C J

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  9. #24  
    If we could float away... Mimixxx's Avatar
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    Sorry to bump this but Jon Hopkins just tweeted this which, I think is relevant here:

    Jon_Hopkins Got paid £8 for 90,000 plays. Fuck spotify.
    M





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  10. #25 Mercury nominee says 'f*ck Spotify'; UK industry voices opinion 
    If we could float away... Mimixxx's Avatar
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    Forget EMI and Google: the news item that has most hit the UK industry's nerve this week appears to be the removal of music from Spotify - which has gone nuclear since Mercury-nominated artist Jon Hopkins claimed this afternoon that he was paid under £10 for almost 100,000 streams on the service.

    The debate went up a gear yesterday, when independent distributor ST Holdings pulled its music catalogue from streaming sites.

    Hopkins turned the air blue on Twitter today, reporting: "Got paid £8 for 90,000 plays. Fuck spotify."

    He later added: "Radio 1 pay about £50 for each play."

    That set in motion a stream of opinion from industry execs to Music Week's @MusicWeekNews account.

    Radio presenter Stuart Miller wrote: "This Spotify thing is a total joke. I make dance music. If Radio 1 plays like 6 mins I get £120 or around that from PRS."

    Universal product manager Steve Marsh came out in Spotify's defence, commenting: "How much did they get paid from pirated music...would that be £0? Spotify is reducing the amount of pirated music."

    Music publishing house Sentric also stuck up for the beleagured platform. They said of Hopkins: "Yes, he gets £120 for a six minute play on Radio 1; because 8 million people are listening to it... If he received 8 million streams on Spotify he'd be earning more than £120 in royalties... Spotify is good for artists & the music industry. Can we all just get along with our lives and embrace it please?"

    Universal's Jamie Vaide said: "Streaming can never replace sales as a major income source - but many people are stealing, not buying... I think the killer point is artists get SOMETHING from @Spotify whereas they get NOTHING from illegal downloading."

    Others were less forgiving. The BBC's Wales Music account Tweeted: "Didn't Madonna get about 3s 6d for millions of plays? Streaming surely can't pay long term for artists..."

    Record producer Dom Morely called Spotify "pointless", while UK pop songwriting collective The House of Mammoth said: "Spotify = this generation's mix tapes."

    Coldplay decided not to release their album Mylo Xyloto onto Spotify and other streaming sites last month.

    Other famous Spotify snubbers include Tom Waits and Adele - whose album 21 is unavailable on the platform, although individual tracks can be streamed.

    http://www.musicweek.com/story.asp?storycode=1047525
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  11. #26  
    Coldplayer fakfak's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mimixxx;5081712
    Sorry to bump this but Jon Hopkins just tweeted this which, I think is relevant here:

    Jon_Hopkins Got paid £8 for 90,000 plays. Fuck spotify.




    I rest my case. The whole thing is just more "everything should be free to everyone on the internet" nonsense dressed up with a token payment to make people feel better about it.
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  12. #27  
    mr coldplaying himself busybeeburns's Avatar
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    PRS supports Spotify amid royalties row

    PRS for Music has given its support to Spotify after songwriters attacked the platform for allegedly paying them meagre royalties.

    Coldplay kept their album Mylo Xyloto from being available on the service last month, after which independent distributor ST Holdings removed much of its catalogue, citing “negligible” royalties and accusing Spotify of “cannibalising revenue from the likes of iTunes”.

    The outcry hit new levels last week when Mercury-nominated songwriter and performer Jon Hopkins tweeted: “Got paid £8 for 90,000 plays. Fuck Spotify.”

    However, director of media licensing at PRS William Booth told Music Week: “Spotify is one of a number of new digital streaming services at the forefront, along with download services, of providing a legal alternative to piracy online.

    “Spotify has always done the right thing and worked with rights holders to ensure their music offering is fully licensed before launch. Our writers and publishers are earning royalties from digital music and this is a growing part of our business; we all need to support these services that are giving users a legal, virus-free and high-quality alternative to peer-to-peer sites and generating an additional income stream for creators. Comparisons with radio or TV broadcasts that may have millions of listeners or viewers are difficult and not always either accurate or appropriate.”

    Spotify has promised to announce a “new direction” for the service at a press conference next Wednesday (November 30) in New York.

    http://www.musicweek.com/story.asp?s...de=1047628&c=1
    The early bird catches the worm. The second mouse gets the cheese!
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  13. #28  
    a thousand houses long ApproximatelyInfinite's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mimixxx;5081712
    Sorry to bump this but Jon Hopkins just tweeted this which, I think is relevant here:

    Jon_Hopkins Got paid £8 for 90,000 plays. Fuck spotify.



    I'd probably be a bit bitter about that too, honestly...yikes.

    However, I do have to say that I do agree with the sentiment of the article you posted after, to a degree...I do think it's a raw deal in some ways for artists as Jon Hopkins has shown here, but at the same time, I kind of think of streaming services like Spotify etc as a small way to combat piracy. I guess £8 is so small it makes no real difference whether 90,000 people pirated his tracks vs. streamed them on Spotify, but I feel like if I happened to be an artist, I'd still be supportive, at least in a small way, of Spotify as an idea and as a platform.

    But yeah, the whole industry really just isn't redeemable from the hands of piracy so it does seem a bit useless to try anymore.

    But I know one day, good things are coming our way

    M A L C J

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  14. #29 Coldplay Manager: I'M Very Concerned. Spotify Competes With Downloads. 
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    Hardly new news, but worth mentioning just the same.

    Coldplay's Manager: "I Am Very Concerned. Spotify Competes With Downloads."
    Monday, January 09, 2012
    by paul

    Coldplay's latest album will eventually make it to Spotify, according to the band's manager. But not until most of the juice has been squeezed from iTunes, which is probably months from now. "I am very concerned,” manager Dave Holmes told BusinessWeek ahead of the weekend. "Spotify competes with download stores."

    The comments come right as the album, Mylo Xyloto, crosses platinum in the US. Of that, nearly 60 percent of the one-million-plus sales have come from paid downloads, according to Nielsen Soundscan. And, in turn, a big chunk of those downloads came from the iTunes Store.

    Which means Spotify users will be the last to get access, according to a loose windowing timetable offered by Holmes. "Like all of Coldplay's other titles, the new album will be on [Spotify] eventually," the manager relayed, which also means the same process starts over again when Coldplay releases another album.

    All of which seems like a raw deal to Spotify executives, especially since major labels have already been paid tens of millions of dollars (at least) for licensing privileges. Yet superstar artists have a very influential voice in this discussion, despite the presence of massive, upfront licensing ransoms. "If Lady Gaga doesn't want her latest album on Spotify, her label will listen or she may get a creative flu or miss certain promotional appearances," Ted Cohen chimed in. "A recording artist can be petulant."

    http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/perm...120109coldplay
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  15. #30  
    mr coldplaying himself busybeeburns's Avatar
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    thanks for posting!
    The early bird catches the worm. The second mouse gets the cheese!
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